Language Arts - Punctuation
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Language Arts - Punctuation - Subjects and Predicates

Subjects and Predicates

Every sentence has a subject and a predicate. In the following sentences the subject is underlined and the predicate is shown in bold.


  Jill flew a kite.

  Jack fell down the hill.

  The mouse ran down the hall.


All sentences have both a subject and a predicate. The subject tells who or what does something in the sentence. The predicate tells what the subject does or is. Here are some more examples:

  Jill wore a dress.

  The glass was full of water.

  They walked on the dunes.


Remember that the predicate always contains a verb.

Compound subjects can be formed by joining two simple subjects. Consider these examples:


  Jill and Jane flew a kite.

  Jack and Bob fell down the hill.

  The mouse and the rat ran down the hall.


These are compound subjects because they have more than one noun in them.

Compound predicates can be formed by joining two or more predicates. Here are some examples:


  Jill fed the mice and cleaned their cages.

  Jack ate the pizza and drank the shake.

  The mouse ate the cheese and took a nap.


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